Latest Release Of SEP 2 Test Tools By QualityLogic

QualityLogic, Inc., global leader in Smart Grid conformance and interoperability test tools, today announced the latest release of its Smart Energy Profile 2 (SEP 2) test tools. QualityLogic has added Metering and Mirrored Metering test functionality to its set of SEP 2 tests.

In December of 2013, QualityLogic introduced its SEP 2 Accelerator Program with a goal of continued development of additional functionality for the SEP 2 Test Tools. The first release was issued in April, 2014 and the November Release is the second of three planned releases. A final release in early 2015 will include tests for Flow Reservation and DER.

“We now have customers in North America, Asia and India using the QualityLogic SEP 2 test tools to validate their implementations for both conformance to the IEEE specification and interoperability with other implementations,” said James Mater, General Manager Smart Grid at QualityLogic. “In addition we have had inquiries from throughout the world. SEP 2 pilots are showing up in residential appliance smart energy applications, EV charging, residential DR programs, and integration of distributed energy resources. The QualityLogic SEP 2 test tools are the only test tools for this standard, and we are pleased to be able to contribute to the industry in this way.”

Pricing has been set for the current release and will be effective until December 27, 2014. After that, prices will increase by over 20 percent for all the SEP 2 test tools.

How to do a Certification Program the Right Way

Let’s begin under the premise that you (end-user, utility, aggregator, etc.) want to acquire technology from different vendors, specify the communications interface between products and have all such products install and work together easily and quickly (similar to adding a new printer to your PC – sometimes it’s called “plug and play”).

The traditional electric utility industry has treated information technology as one-off, customized systems, but is taking advantage of best practices learned in other areas of technology. The traditional approach is time-consuming and generally includes proprietary or custom-built solutions. It is expensive to develop, maintain modify and use.

Aiming for off-the-shelf, “plug and play” interoperability of systems and components is a goal of smart grid standards, with tremendous payoffs, such as reduced overall costs (for all parties); faster deployments; minimized stranded assets; reduced maintenance and higher quality results. Getting to this point takes a new set of best practices and behaviors, and at times can be a challenging learning process. Certified products are the starting point for achieving the goal and help navigate the sea of smart grid technologies in the global market. Certification is a key indicator that product vendors are committed to delivering interoperable products.

Achieving Plug and Play Interoperability: What does it take?

Fundamental to achieving the goals of the industry is an understanding of the challenges associated with bringing a standard from paper to practice. Most important is the recognition that because a standard has been adopted internationally does not mean every vendor will implement it the same way. A simple example illustrates this challenge:

In OpenADR 2.0, a Demand Response (DR) event message can have an “importance value” ranging from 0 to 3 (0, 1, 2, or 3). However, this value could appear as a whole number (0, 1, 2, 3) or as a decimal number (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0) in the messages exchanged between devices. Although both these numeric representations are valid for a floating point value (the schema requirement), if one vendor’s implementation is looking for “1” in a received payload and another is looking for “1.0” when they exchange an event message with the importance value, one of the receiving vendor’s systems may not understand what is being asked of it. This kind of problem is typically uncovered in the field when two purportedly standard implementations try communicating with each other.

Through vendor and customer staff investigation of the products, and then negotiation among the parties, one vendor will make a change. But what happens when a customer purchases two other “standard” systems possessing different interpretations of the specification? The whole discovery process must be employed again and the result is two customers with essentially unique solutions instead of “plug and play” standardized solutions.

Multiply this scenario by hundreds of opportunities in any standard for differing interpretations and it is apparent how interoperability problems happen even with adopted standards.

There are a number of industry practices that have evolved over the years for achieving “plug and play” interoperability. The key practices may be broken down into two primary activities: 1) conformance testing and 2) interoperability testing. Conformance is simply validating that a vendor has implemented according to the standard. This is typically done with a conformance test program that is referred to as a “certification” program if conducted by a formal industry alliance, such as the Wifi Alliance, BlueTooth SIG and OpenADR Alliance.

But in the real world of deployments, it is not unusual to have two conformant products that do not interoperate. A conformance test program is a necessary first step that eliminates many of the headaches that would otherwise occur in getting products from two vendors work well together. This cannot substitute for actual interoperability testing of systems and devices expected to function together in a specific scenario. Why? Even with every capability and all options defined in a standard tested for conformance, it is still possible that some sequence of interaction between two systems turns over an interoperability issue.

Achieving conformance to a standard requires well-written standards that include precise “conformance” statements in the standard itself and interoperability testing as a compliment to conformance testing. Well-written standards contain statements specifying what a product must do to be “conformant” to the standard. This is usually a well considered subset of all possible implementations of the standard and serves as the basis for a Protocol Implementation Conformance Statement (PICS). While gaining industry consensus on what it means to be “conformant” to a standard can be challenging, it is crucial to the creation and operation of a quality conformance certification program.

It is also a well understood best practice that to achieve our goal of “plug and play” interoperability it is important to bring together real products from real vendors with complex test scenarios to insure they work well together. Industry alliances do so in what are termed “plugfests” or “interops” or “test events” and these serve to surface the interoperability issues not discovered and addressed in formal conformance certification programs. More mature certification programs even include interoperability testing as part of their certification program.

At the end of the day, unless different vendor products are tested together under a rigorous set of scenarios, plug and play interoperability in practice may take some work. If there is a rigorous conformance certification program in place and you start with certified products then 80% or more of the necessary interoperability work may well be accomplished!

The Role of Certification Programs

As discussed, a critical part of achieving plug and play products is to develop and execute an industry conformance certification test program. The greatest value of such a program is that the industry (vendors and key customers) must agree ahead of time on the precise interpretations of the standard and how the implementations are tested to prove that the implementations are done correctly. This is what a “certification test” program does.

Readers need only think of USB, Wifi, BlueTooth product logos to understand the benefits of mature certification programs that deliver plug and play functionality to consumers. These programs took years of industry work to achieve the precise definitions of conformance (and interoperability) that have led to the ease of interoperation we are used to.

In the smart grid area, a number of programs are in the process of achieving maturity but will only do so when the industry understands how to achieve plug and play interoperability and requires it from the alliances implementing certification programs.

From a practical standpoint, there are far more possible tests that can be done than makes sense (from a time and cost perspective.) Therefore, a certification test program follows the 80/20 rule – the 20% of functionality that is most likely to be implemented will get the most focus from a conformance testing perspective. This is not to say that the other 80% doesn’t get tested at all, just less rigorously. And some aspects of the standard may be out of scope from a certification testing perspective. For instance, OpenADR is a message exchange protocol. While the standard does define how events can be targeted at specific devices (such as a pool pump), verifying the actual functional behavior (did the pump shed load) would be outside the scope of conformance testing. As long as the message was exchanged, the protocol did its job.

Certifications that are well designed and executed are extremely valuable for the following reasons:

  • – They serve as a starting point for implementing a system that requires multiple vendor’s products – specifying certified products greatly reduces integration issues, time and costs;
    – Certified products significantly reduce the effort to implement systems in practice which incorporate multiple certified products;
    – Certified products indicate that a standard is likely to be around for a significant period of time, reducing the risks and costs of stranded assets based on obsolete technologies;
    – Reduced costs of integrated solutions have long term dividends;
    – When a good certification program is in place, it is relatively easy to replace one vendor with another, enabling price competition as well as reduced impact of vendor failure.

To be clear, not all certification programs are created equal. The key attributes that indicate the maturity and quality of a certification program include:

  • – They are based upon a detailed agreement between industry stakeholders (the PICS document) as to how a standard must be implemented to achieve interoperability functions and features;
    – They provide a rigorous and independent verification that the claimed conformance does exist. The independent testing is provided by highly qualified 3rd party test labs;
    – Certified products are typically re-certified when major updates are made, insuring that the updates are also conformant and certified;
    – The test tools for certification are commercial quality and available as pre-certification test tools for vendors planning to certify products and users of the technology to use as acceptance tests;

The following case study of the OpenADR Alliance represents one of the leading programs as judged against the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel’s “Interoperability Process Reference Manual” (SGIP IPRM [1]). To gain a deeper understanding of what makes a certification program valuable, the materials in the IPRM provide an excellent roadmap to a mature certification program.

A Certification Program Case Study

We know that a good certification program will improve plug and play interoperability in the sense that everyone is obeying the rules but there are other factors that influence the achievement of this goal. One critical factor is how much of the functional behavior in a system is outside the scope of the standard itself. In the case of OpenADR some aspects of how the standard is used are deployment specific and the usage models are outside the scope of the OpenADR Profile Specification.

The OpenADR Alliance is working on methods to reduce sources of interoperability issues that are outside of the scope of the standard to compliment its certification program. The certification program model incorporates best practices from other industries and is evolving into an outstanding program. The core elements of the program include:

1. A detailed Protocol Conformance Implementation Statement (PICS) that clearly specifies what being conformant to the OpenADR 2.0 standard requires. A PICS document is an articulation of the testable requirements for the standard and serves two purposes. It guides the development of specific certification test cases and it acts as a tick list for vendors to assert that they have implemented all the requirements.
2. Detailed test specifications, which guided the development of the certification test harness.
3. Separate certification test harness and certification lab vendors. This insures the existence of one official certification test harness (implementing the test specification) and enables the OpenADR Alliance to add multiple Labs while insuring consistent certification by all labs. [2] 4. Ownership of the test harness by OpenADR Alliance. This asset provides the OpenADR Alliance control over a key aspect of the program.
5. Availability of the test harness to vendors and others as an engineering test tool as well as a pre-certification test tool. The modest test harness cost is reasonable and typically pays for itself in reduced certification costs. In the first 2 years of offering the test harness, over 60 companies have acquired the test harness and almost every company seeking certification of their products uses the test harness for pre-certification.

Although we have yet to implement it in OpenADR, most certification programs include some kind of “golden” devices to test with for device-to-device interoperation validation. The OpenADR Alliance does conduct periodic test events to accomplish the interoperability aspects of “plug and play” best practices.

There are other aspects to making an industry alliance a success, but the key attributes of the test and certification program are providing rapid acceptance of “Certified OpenADR Compliant” as a quality certification that greatly increases the interoperability of products developed based on the OpenADR 2.0 standard.

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[1] See Smart Grid Interoperability Panel Test and Certifications Committee “Interoperability Process Reference Manual, Version 2.0”, January 2012.
[2] Some certification programs allow each lab to develop their own certification test tools, which leads to potentially different certifications and interoperability problems.

Original Content: How to do a Certification Program the Right Way

New Workshop For Implementing Automated DR

QualityLogic Inc. (www.qualitylogic.com), the official training partner of the OpenADR Alliance, is offering a new workshop, “Implementing Automated Demand Response (DR) Programs,” for utilities, DR designers, and program implementers who are planning to use OpenADR 2.0. OpenADR 2.0 is a low-cost, speedy, reliable communications infrastructure that allows utilities and grid operators to send DR signals directly to building automation and control systems on customers’ sites using a common language and existing communications technology.

The one-day workshop is endorsed by the OpenADR Alliance, which fosters the development, adoption, and compliance of the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard through collaboration, education, training, testing, and certification.

The primary purpose of the Implementing Automated DR Programs Workshop is to inform utility DR program managers, designers and implementers about how best to use OpenADR-based systems for automating DR. The workshop covers:

  • OpenADR 2.0 features and functions;
  • Designing DR programs with OpenADR 2.0;
  • OpenADR and the Demand Response Management System; and
  • Interoperability and pre-deployment testing methodologies and tools.

“OpenADR 2.0 brings reliability, predictability and lower costs to demand-response solutions for commercial, industrial and residential applications,” said James Mater, QualityLogic co-founder and Smart Grid Business general manager. “We’ve been helping companies get started with this important Smart Grid standard through training for several years now, and we’re pleased to bring this class to those working on OpenADR 2.0 implementation.”

“This workshop is an invaluable resource for anyone developing, implementing or managing DR programs,” said Barry Haaser, managing director, OpenADR Alliance. “Attendees will gain valuable insight into how the OpenADR standard can be used to create secure, reliable, affordable and scalable DR and energy efficiency programs.”

The private workshops, led by QualityLogic Chief Test Architect Jim Zuber, are conducted on-site or near-site for members of a specific organization. The private workshop format enables an open dialog about specific company issues and allows the team to derive maximum value from the expert instruction and resources in a confidential setting.

Cloud-based Test System for OpenADR Products

QualityLogic Inc. (www.qualitylogic.com), the developer of the OpenADR Alliance Certification Test Harness, today announced the OpenADR Cloud Based Test System for OpenADR Virtual End Nodes (VENs) or clients, which will provide users with access to a Cloud server implementation of a certified Virtual Top Node (VTN). The system uses an OpenADR Alliance certified open source VTN released by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to serve as a reference for testing Virtual End Nodes (VENs), as a platform for running small scale pilots, or as a learning tool to increase understanding of the OpenADR technology.

The OpenADR standard facilitates sending and receiving demand response (DR) signals from a utility or independent system operator to electric customers. OpenADR signals are transmitted by VTN servers to end devices or other intermediate servers. A VEN is typically a client, such as an energy management system, a thermostat or other end device that accepts the OpenADR signal from a VTN.

Those deploying OpenADR-certified products have been seeking an easy and fast method of configuring and executing interoperability tests between VEN products and a reference VTN implementation. The new Cloud-based test system addresses this need and complements the certification of products by the OpenADR Alliance (www.openadr.org). The cloud-based test system enables the development of interoperability tests mirroring specific deployment scenarios that can be run prior to VENs being deployed in the field.

While a beta version of the EPRI VTN is available for download at no charge from Source Forge, QualityLogic has deployed the certified open source code in Amazon’s EC2 Cloud system with added benefits to subscribers. Each subscriber is provided with a unique VTN server implementation and can start using the VTN for interoperability tests without the need to download, install and configure a version in their lab. QualityLogic has added an administrative interface and is making technical support and training available for users of the Cloud-Based Test System for VENs.

The QualityLogic OpenADR Cloud Based Test System subscriptions will be available starting November 3, 2014 for a special introductory price of $100 per month, with minimum two-month subscription required. For a limited time, subscribers who complete a detailed survey about additional capabilities and features they would like to see in the Cloud-Based Test System will receive a credit for one month free usage.

QualityLogic Announces Cloud-Based Test System for OpenADR Products

QualityLogic Inc. (www.qualitylogic.com), the developer of the OpenADR Alliance Certification Test Harness, today announced the Cloud-Based Test System for OpenADR Virtual End Nodes (VENs) or clients, which will provide users with access to a Cloud server implementation of a certified Virtual Top Node (VTN). The system uses an OpenADR Alliance certified open source VTN released by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to serve as a reference for testing Virtual End Nodes (VENs), as a platform for running small scale pilots, or as a learning tool to increase understanding of the OpenADR technology.

The OpenADR standard facilitates sending and receiving demand response (DR) signals from a utility or independent system operator to electric customers. OpenADR signals are transmitted by VTN servers to end devices or other intermediate servers. A VEN is typically a client, such as an energy management system, a thermostat or other end device that accepts the OpenADR signal from a VTN.

Those deploying OpenADR-certified products have been seeking an easy and fast method of configuring and executing interoperability tests between VEN products and a reference VTN implementation. The new Cloud-based test system addresses this need and complements the certification of products by the OpenADR Alliance (http://www.openadr.org). The cloud-based test system enables the development of interoperability tests mirroring specific deployment scenarios that can be run prior to VENs being deployed in the field.

While a beta version of the EPRI VTN is available for download at no charge from Source Forge, QualityLogic has deployed the certified open source code in Amazon’s EC2 Cloud system with added benefits to subscribers. Each subscriber is provided with a unique VTN server implementation and can start using the VTN for interoperability tests without the need to download, install and configure a version in their lab. QualityLogic has added an administrative interface and is making technical support and training available for users of the Cloud-Based Test System for VENs.

The QualityLogic OpenADR Cloud Based Test System subscriptions will be available starting November 3, 2014 for a special introductory price of $100 per month, with minimum two-month subscription required. For a limited time, subscribers who complete a detailed survey about additional capabilities and features they would like to see in the Cloud-Based Test System will receive a credit for one month free usage.

About Qualitylogic

QualityLogic was selected by the OpenADR Alliance to develop a conformance and interoperability test tool for OpenADR compliant products. QualityLogic is the testing partner for the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration, the largest project of its kind in the U.S. The Company offers interoperability, conformance, and certification test solutions for other Smart Energy technologies and is an active participant in Smart Grid standards activities, including the OpenADR and Bluetooth Alliance, Consortium for SEP 2 Interoperability, SGIP, GWAC, and others.

For more information, visit www.qualitylogic.com.

Demand Response World Forum 2014 Workshop

The Smart Grid Observer has announced a Demand Response World Forum 2014 pre-conference workshop to be presented by QualityLogic Inc., the official training partner of the OpenADR Alliance. “Implementing Automated Demand Response Programs” is for utilities, DR designers, and program implementers who are planning to use OpenADR 2.0. OpenADR 2.0 is a low-cost, speedy, reliable communications infrastructure that allows utilities and grid operators to send DR signals directly to building automation and control systems on customers’ sites using a common language and existing communications technology.

The one-day workshop is endorsed by the OpenADR Alliance, which fosters the development, adoption, and compliance of the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard through collaboration, education, training, testing, and certification.

The primary purpose of the Implementing Automated Demand Response Programs Workshop is to inform utility DR program managers, designers and implementers about how best to use OpenADR-based systems for automating DR. The workshop covers:

  • OpenADR 2.0 features and functions;
  • Designing DR programs with OpenADR 2.0;
  • OpenADR and the Demand Response Management System; and
  • Interoperability and pre-deployment testing methodologies and tools.

“OpenADR 2.0 brings reliability, predictability and lower costs to demand-response solutions for commercial, industrial and residential applications,” said James Mater, QualityLogic co-founder and Smart Grid Business general manager. “We’ve been helping companies get started with this important Smart Grid standard through training for several years now, and we’re pleased to have been invited to bring this class to the Demand Response World Forum.”

“This workshop is an invaluable resource for anyone developing, implementing or managing DR programs,” said Barry Haaser, managing director, OpenADR Alliance. “Attendees will gain valuable insight into how the OpenADR standard can be used to create secure, reliable, affordable and scalable DR and energy efficiency programs.”

The workshop, led by QualityLogic Chief Test Architect Jim Zuber, will be held October 13 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at the Hilton Orange County / Costa Mesa.

The Workshop precedes the Demand Response World Forum 2014 at the Hilton Orange County / Costa Mesa on October 14-15. The Forum will bring together professionals from around the world to explore the latest auto-DR technologies and strategies for meeting the changing energy landscape of the 21st Century. 42 top speakers will join technology innovators and business leaders to examine the evolving role of ADR in enabling an integrated and flexible network that is responsive to a wide range of energy resources, marketplace entities, and customer energy demand and generation. Those registering for both the World Forum and the pre-conference Workshop are entitled to a special discount.

ABOUT THE SMART GRID OBSERVER

The Smart Grid Observer is a key online information portal and weekly e-newsletter serving the global smart grid industry. SGO delivers the latest news and information on a daily basis concerning key technology developments, deployment updates, standards work, business issues, and market trends driving the smart grid and energy storage industries worldwide. The publication serves a global readership of executives and practitioners in the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry. Companies include public and privately owned utilities, equipment and component manufacturers, software developers, government agencies and municipalities, consulting firms, and others.

ABOUT QUALITYLOGIC

QualityLogic was selected by the OpenADR Alliance to develop a conformance and interoperability test tool for OpenADR compliant products, and by Itron to develop and conduct testing for its ChoiceConnect® ERT® Certification Program. QualityLogic is the testing partner for the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration, the largest project of its kind in the U.S. The Company offers interoperability, conformance, and certification test solutions for other Smart Energy technologies and is an active participant in Smart Grid standards activities, including the OpenADR and Bluetooth Alliance, Consortium for SEP 2 Interoperability, SGIP, GWAC, and others. For more information, visit www.qualitylogic.com.

ABOUT THE OPENADR ALLIANCE

The OpenADR Alliance fosters the development, adoption, and compliance of the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard through collaboration, education, training, testing, and certification. The OpenADR Alliance is open to all interested stakeholders interested in accelerating the adoption of the OpenADR standard for price- and reliability-based demand response. More information can be obtained at www.openadr.org

QualityLogic Announces SEP 2 Developers Workshop

SEP 2 Accelerator Program Beta 1 to Ship June 27; Program to End

QualityLogic today announced its first public workshop for SEP 2 Developers. The two-day workshop, to be held September 9-10 in Simi Valley, CA, will focus on the basics of SEP 2 technology on the first day and testing of SEP 2 during the second day. The training is aimed at product developers working with the SEP 2 technology and is ideal as a starting point to jump start a development project. Utility vendors, alliances and test labs – both internal and third-party – will also benefit from the training.

QualityLogic is the leading vendor of test tools for the Smart Energy Protocol (SEP 2), which was originally developed by the Zigbee Alliance and is now an IEEE standard. A new release planned for June 27 will include almost 100 certification tests for the Functional Test Suite and new features in the interoperability test platform known as the Ad Hoc Tester.

The QualityLogic SEP 2 Accelerator program will be closed to new participants June 30. Two subscriptions are still available. Members receive significant discounts on products and services, including free and discounted seats at the upcoming SEP 2 workshop, and will also receive at least two more releases as part of the program. For more information, contact James Mater at jmater@qualitylogic.com.

“We’ve been working with SEP 2 since 2011, and we contributed to the SEP 2 Application Protocol Specification,” said James Mater, QualityLogic Smart Grid Business general manager. “Our SEP 2 Client and Server Ad Hoc Testers have been used by device manufacturers, utilities, and commercial test labs around the world to create real-world SEP 2 scenarios and validate conformance to the protocol specification. We’re pleased support the SEP 2 community with continuing updates to these tests via the SEP 2 Accelerator Program and our new workshop.”

For more information about the class, visit www.qualitylogic.com.

Implementing Auto. DR Programs Utilities Workshop

QualityLogic Inc. announced that it will provide Automated Demand Response (DR) implementation training for utilities, DR designers, and program implementers who are planning to use OpenADR 2.0. OpenADR 2.0 is a low-cost, speedy, reliable communications infrastructure that allows utilities and grid operators to send DR signals directly to building automation and control systems on customers’ sites using a common language and existing communications technology.

The one-day workshop is endorsed by the OpenADR Alliance that fosters the development, adoption, and compliance of the Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) standard through collaboration, education, training, testing, and certification.

The primary purpose of the Implementing Automated Demand Response Programs Workshop is to inform utility DR program managers, designers and implementers about how best to use OpenADR-based systems for automating DR. The workshop covers:

  • OpenADR 2.0 features and functions;
  • Designing DR programs with OpenADR 2.0;
  • OpenADR and the Demand Response Management System; and
  • Interoperability and pre-deployment testing methodologies and tools.

“OpenADR 2.0 brings reliability, predictability and lower costs to demand-response solutions for commercial, industrial and residential applications,” said James Mater, QualityLogic co-founder and Smart Grid Business general manager. “We’ve been helping companies get started with this important Smart Grid standard through training for several years now, and we’re pleased to bring additional focus on the needs of utilities with this class.”

The workshop is offered on-site or near-site for members of a specific organization. The private format enables an open dialog and specific company issues and provides the maximum value from the expert instruction. A public workshop is planned for this fall. The date and time are to be announced.

How to Achieve Interoperable Products Based on Smart Grid Standards

The Smart Grid industry has made great strides in establishing and maturing technology standards that facilitate interoperability of Smart Grid products. To achieve in-the-field interoperability, however, requires a standardized set of engineering test tools integrated with a robust certification program.

Engineering test tools are as essential to successful products based on interoperability standards as are the technical specifications themselves. Industry certification programs need to be part of a comprehensive set of test tools and a continuous development, test, and certification process. Benefits include accelerated interoperability, shorter development and certification schedules, and dramatically reduced engineering costs.

One Standard, One Set of Tests

The whole point of an industry standard is to have one agreed upon definition of what a technology does and how it communicates. For instance, a standard may have a single definition of “time.” Two systems that conform to the standard would understand what each means when it communicates a timestamp. While a standard may specify different representations of time for different contexts, it wouldn’t specify two different meanings of time.

By the same logic, why would you have two tests that expect different results for the same definition of time? You might have context-sensitive definitions of time but for any specific context, you’d want only one test result that proves that the product understands time in the context specified. Yet we find two glaring problems in the efforts to enforce “standards” for products claiming to conform to a standard through certification:

• competing test labs may develop their own sets of tests; and
• “certification” tests do not provide the richness, depth, and type of test coverage needed to ensure that “compliant” products will actually interoperate. The more exhaustive the test, the more expensive and time consuming it is….

Click here to read the whole article – How to Achieve Interoperable Products Based on Smart Grid Standards

QualityLogic Plans For SEP 2 Accelerator Beta 1

QualityLogic has announced that the Beta 1 installment of its SEP 2 Accelerator Program will be released before June 30. The program has enabled the continued development of definitive SEP 2 conformance and interoperability test systems.  QualityLogic plans to close the program to new participants on June 30.

The Beta 1 release will include 90 client and server conformance tests for APPS, COM, DCAP, DI, DNS, DRLC, DSGN, EDEV, RSPS, TM, TP, SUB, TLS, CERT, FSA and UPT, and will include the first tests for Metering. The tests represent the most thorough standard conformance tests defined for these function sets. Additional detail on the planned Beta 1 release will be made available to Accelerator Partners as the release date approaches.

The SEP 2 Accelerator Program, which offers significant discounts on the SEP 2 test products from QualityLogic, will be closed to new participants on June 30. This is to ensure that all participants receive the attention appropriate to beta sites.

After the close of the Accelerator Program on June 30, non-participant companies will still be able to license the SEP 2 test tools at standard prices. As of July 1, standard prices will increase to recognize the value added in the Beta 1 release.

QualityLogic and CloudMonkey Enter VAR Agreement

Simi Valley, CA and Boulder, CO (PRWEB) April 29, 2014

QualityLogic Inc. and CloudMonkey Mobile LLC, a subsidiary of Gorilla Logic, announced today that the companies have signed a Value Added Reseller Agreement under which QualityLogic will market CloudMonkey LabManager and MonkeyTalk Pro mobile application test tools.

QualityLogic will offer the CloudMonkey tools to companies that have mobile application development initiatives as part of a new test solution called Mobile Application Test System (MATS). MATS is a customizable toolbox of tools and services that solves mobile test problems. A QualityLogic “Tiger Team” evaluates each client’s needs, matches cost-effective solutions to those needs, and implement the solutions.

“Most companies have an increasing requirement to offer reliable mobile solutions for their web properties,” according to Gary James, QualityLogic services general manager and co-founder. “To address this need, we performed in-depth analysis of a wide variety of mobile application test tools, and CloudMonkey’s solutions came out on top as the overall leader in features and were by far the most cost-effective. We’re thrilled to offer these state-of-the-art tools as part of our new MATS offering.”

“We’re pleased to work with QualityLogic to bring MonkeyTalk Pro and CloudMonkey LabManager to companies that are developing their mobile presence,” said Stu Stern, Gorilla Logic/CloudMonkey president and CEO. “Our tools, combined with QualityLogic’s extensive testing expertise, will provide a much-needed solution for mobile application testing.”

The menu of offerings from which MATS clients may choose includes:

  • QA Assessment of the client’s mobile needs profile
  • “Quick Start” service to get clients going on automated mobile application testing
  • Setup, deployment and training on the test automation development environment and device control system
  • Automation test script development and execution
  • Mobile testing best practices and knowledge of testing mobile, web and hybrid applications
  • Training, documentation and transfer of the test system, with ongoing support

For more information, visit https://www.qualitylogic.com.

About QualityLogic

QualityLogic is a highly respected provider of QA and engineering services, offering a flexible menu of services at customers’ sites, at QualityLogic’s labs, or as managed services that scale to meet customers’ needs. The Company is well known for its quality assurance and competitive analysis expertise in the printer and telecom industries. Fortune 1000 companies also rely on QualityLogic to make sure the content of their primary marketing tools – their website and mobile applications – meets their quality objectives and promote and protect their brands.

About CloudMonkey Mobile

CloudMonkey Mobile is dedicated to helping customers achieve stellar application quality while moving at agile speed. CloudMonkey tools are used every day by teams worldwide to help create the mobile apps we depend on. Based in Boulder, Colorado, CloudMonkey LLC was spun off from Gorilla Logic, Inc. in September 2013. CloudMonkey Mobile is the creator of MonkeyTalk, a simple and powerful tool for automated functional testing on all of today’s major mobile platforms, and CloudMonkey LabManager, a complete mobile-test platform offering shared access for manual and automated testing on dozens of mobile devices.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1880305#ixzz4D4UqJd3I

Original Content: QualityLogic and CloudMonkey Enter VAR Agreement

SEP 2.0 Accelerator Program Produces 1st Results

QualityLogic today announced that its Smart Energy Profile (SEP) 2.0 Accelerator Program is already producing results for participants. The program aims to accelerate the maturity and adoption of SEP 2.0 technology by moving the industry forward with needed test tools to support certification, engineering and deployment testing of SEP 2.0 products.

The test systems include conformance and interoperability tests for DRLC, Messaging and Pricing function sets, plus support for related SEP 2.0 Common and Support resources, Security and Discovery. The Accelerator Program is adding new conformance tests and key additional function set test capabilities for Metering, Flow Reservation and DER.

An interim engineering release, available April 18, includes 30 new conformance tests for Client and Server functionality. These tests cover 81 Server Protocol Implementation Conformance Statements (PICS) and 45 Client PICS for a core group of Function Sets required for any SEP 2 product. Other additions include:

  • PICS coverage reporting for the Ad hoc tester that will allow users to review which PICS are covered when performing Ad Hoc testing.
  • Log Items window in the Ad hoc tester that will allow users to individually inspect each SEP 2.0 message that was transmitted or received during a test.
  • Additional updates to address SEP 2.0 interoperability issues discovered since the last release in September.

For more information on the SEP 2 Accelerator Program or the interim engineering release, contact James Mater at jmater@qualitylogic.com or visit www.qualitylogic.com.